I’m still alive

December came and went. January came and went. February came and went…

Yes, I’m alive. I’ve been going through a whirlwind this past few months. Here’s a few things that have gone on.

A promotion!

Yep, the wonderful folks I work for at {redacted} have given me the grand title of “Principal Software Developer.”

Having worked here for 5 years now, I am officially to blame for most all the code here. I’ve been here long enough to own it. It’s my bad, folks, but it’ll get better, I promise.

Softball Season

I help run a local girls’ slowpitch league, and have been coaching and umpiring for 5 years now. Softball season starts around the beginning of March, but the work up to the season starting is substantial.

Coaching and helping out my league is meaningful for me. I don’t have better words for it. It’s just an amazing thing that I love to do.

Conferences

I was at Agile Open Northwest and a local programmer introduced a concept he was excited about called “tiny objects”, wherein he used C# to make objects that had:

  1. No state.
  2. Content that was immutable.
  3. Just methods.

Finally, he had constructed a few rules as well, to make mocking and testing easier.  Specifically, there was to be no static methods on an object.

var example = "some string";
var stringUpper = new StringUppercaser(example).Result;
Assert.That(stringUpper, Is.EqualTo("SOME STRING"));

It. Was. Surreal.

This developer was exactly where I had been. Frustrated by state logic. Completely tired of dealing with new ways to worry about async and threading issues. He just had not heard of or even considered that the language itself was part of the problem.

That is simply why this blog exists.

Immediately, I setup a quick session in the conference to go over how functional programming works, and where to learn about it. Hopefully, I helped some folks see the light, but I doubt it, as I didn’t have a great talk already ‘set up.’ My note to self after that session was that putting together a half-hour talk on What and Why F# is just something I should have in my back pocket.


So there it is.  With a new promotion and getting my team ready to go, we are knee deep in a hundred different maintenance projects. Too many projects, not enough F#!

Thanks to the folks at F# Weekly finding my Fishful of Dollars post!

Managing Expectations

Non-F# content warning: Skip to the next one if you’re not interested in general stuff.

Generally, a working programmer doesn’t have too many difficult “non-programming” tasks. Difficulty is the name of our game, and we like it that way. That said, one of the most critical skills a developer has is to manage folks’ expectations of you. Thought-work, in general requires a level of communication that seems nonstandard and maybe a little unnatural to your work.

The reality of being a working programmer is this: Your boss probably doesn’t exactly understand what you’re doing. Your boss may be relying on you to do a good job, regardless of his/her detailed understanding of your work. Making sure those expectations are set properly is key to keeping this relationship copacetic.

An Example: A customer asks you to sneak in a quick feature. You’ve taken a swag at it, and it looks like it won’t take more than a few hours and doesn’t impact anything, so you agree. Your customer leaves you happy, and everything seems fine. Fast forward to a week from now. The feature you were supposed to be working is late, and blocking everything going out. Your customer, who felt like his request was tiny, and shouldn’t impact anything, complains to your boss that the feature is late. Your boss, who has no idea that you agreed to anything, has now the unpleasant task of defending why the feature is late, even though she/he didn’t know it was part of the release. That makes her/him look disorganized and incompetent, and that’s not how you want to make your boss feel or look, even if you hate her/him.

Take a look at your day to day interactions and communications. Do folks know what you are doing? Do they know when you releasing your work?

Here’s a tip. Don’t assume that folks are reading every email, or “making the connection.” Make yourself very clear about what you are doing, when you expect to be complete, and if there are any items blocking you. If you are not sure yourself what to be doing, there is a very good chance you have not managed expectations well.